So Why Do Quadcopters Make Great Christmas Presents?

If you are looking for that perfect Christmas present this year for boys (and girls!) of all ages then you really should look at one of the many different choices of quadcopters and drones that are available today!

You really want that excitement and that sheer look of happiness when they open their presents Christmas morning and once they unwrap their new drone or copter… well, you will not have to wonder if you have got it right. The smiles and wide eyes will tell you clearly enough!

Why Quadcopters Make Great Christmas Presents #1:

Quadcopters are still relatively new technology, well, at least when we are talking about as a commercially available toy. Sure, they have been around for a little while now however up until recent times, they have been very expensive and not nearly geared and built as much for fun as they are today. What this means is that a new quadcopter is not going to be under every single tree so there will be quite a lot of uniqueness and also, envy from your children’s friends! It is probably also the very first time they have received such a toy and let me tell you, a drone or quadcopter really is a toy like no other!

Why Quadcopters Make Great Christmas Presents #2:

They appeal to all everybody and all ages too! Quadcopters are a huge amount of fun and they aren’t just for boys either! Girls also love being “pilots” and enjoying the thrill of commanding their drone either just around the skies or performing intricate stunts and manoeuvres. And these bad boys of the sky aren’t just for kids either. From as young as 7 years old right up to grandparents, there is a drone or quadcopter that will suit.

Why Quadcopters Make Great Christmas Presents #3:

There is an absolutely HUGE range of quadcopters for sale that will cater to any budget and also please the most demanding of “pilots.” From a small entry level quadcopter that can fit into the palm of your hand, right up to an incredibly advanced… and expensive version that costs more than the average family car! Want four propellers? No problem? How about an eight propeller octocopter? Too easy! Want a protective circular cage around your drone or maybe perhaps even in the shape of a fighter jet? There are so many different options available to you! Just go down to your favorite RC store, choose what you want and you are ready to go!

Why Quadcopters Make Great Christmas Presents #4:

These awesome machines are not only accessible to everyone, but they are easy to learn for everyone as well. You do not need to have any special skills or aeronautical experience but you will need some patience and of course, time to practice. Many of these models today are flyable right out of the box but as with everything good in life, you will need to practice and fully understand your new drone in order to get the most out of it.

It’s clear to see that I think quadcopters are awesome! So much fun, such amazing technology and many with brilliant features that allow extreme aerobatics, return to base features, and of course the ability to come with or add cameras such as GoPro’s which open up a whole new world of vision and experiences. And let’s not forget about the growing movement of drone racing! Now this really is an exciting new field!

Creating Presentations

When asked to give a presentation, consider using the four P’s of presentation steps to help you with your creation. The four P’s are: Plan, Prepare, Practice, and Perform. This article will address steps one and two, which are about planning and preparing the presentation.

1. During Plan, you will consider your audience and why you are giving the presentation along with what generally appeals to them and why they may want to know about your subject. You will determine with the person requesting the presentation how much time you will have and what type of visual aids may be relevant and usable at the location of final presentation. You can find some hints in the Briefing section of the book “R.A!R.A! A Meeting Wizards’ Approach” that aids in development of planning questions to ask during this step such as:

  • When do I need to be there? Date of presentation with start/end times and location.
  • Who will be there? Description of primary audience and names of decision makers.
  • What will appeal to this audience and why do they want to know about this subject? Reason(s) presentation is necessary or relevant to this audience.
  • What types of supporting documents and audio/visuals are preferred by audience? Items such as projection or handouts that is preferred by or available with this audience.
  • How much of presentation time should be allowed for questions and answers at the end? Most presentations are followed by Q&A from audience to speaker and knowing the desired timeframe allows better time allotment of prepared speaking points.

2. Prepare your presentation by thinking about both the beginning and ending, and then add the detail in the middle that supports your strong start and end. Now that you know what to say and are aware of your visual aid limitation, think about how you can make the presentation memorable by developing any visuals that may accompany the presentation making sure their flow matches the presentation. When developing visuals, remember you don’t want people fumbling with handouts or noting spelling errors when they could be listening. When preparing, consider what the Presentation Plan form in the book “R.A!R.A! A Meeting Wizards’ Approach” suggests as possible outline questions for a briefing presentation:

  • Why are we here? Reasons presentation is necessary or desirable at this time.
  • What have we done? History, work, or statistics related to purpose or presentation.
  • What do we plan to do? Possible future outcomes or actions as result of presentation or decision to be made based on presentation.
  • What have we learned? Summary of presentation or recommendations.
  • What have we to share? Stories, statistics, charts, or other data to prove points.
  • What do we need? Resources to facilitate presentation and discussion or to accomplish actions.

With the Plan and Prepare steps, you have learned to ask questions to help you develop speaking points and visuals aids. To understand the Practice and Perform steps, see article on “Delivering Presentations”.

Canned Sales Presentations Just Don’t Work Today

Flip charts and slides shows (“canned presentations”) make the best sales product or service promotions because, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” right? Well it depends!

Stanford University’s Research Institute’s VALS study (values, altitudes and life styles) lists five distinct psychographic categories (personalities) or buying decision-making modes. What the Stanford research means to you as a sales manager is that a given picture may not appeal to one or more of the buying mind-sets (Belongers, Achiever, Emulator, etc.) outlined in the study. Using a flip chart or slides as your primary presentation tool can cost you sales, especially if you just walk through each page or play each slide as an outline of your products or service’s features and benefits.

Flip charts and slide presentations must be generic by nature and rarely focus on a decision-maker’s specific needs except for a few slides or pages. From the Stanford research, using this selling approach means that you have one chance in five of appealing to your decision-maker’s primary buying mode depending on the layout and copy theme of the slides or chart.

Slide shows or flip chart presentations are valuable tools if used to highlight specific selling points–points based in the information that your staff members uncover from their in-depth probing (using a consultative selling system) of a prospective customer or client’s needs. The myth of using a “canned sales pitch” and the field-tested and proven selling methods to replace defective techniques are outlined in the “best selling” 101 Sales Myths manual published by The $elling Edge┬«, Inc. (http://TheSellingEdge.com/myths3.htm) The techniques listed are are based in a proven consultative selling process that eliminates most of the fear and pressure associated with traditional presentation approaches.