I Failed at Delivering My First Presentation

I was in my 6th grade and I was asked to participate in a debate as I was fairly good in my academics. I still remember the topic of the debate – Building Castles in the Air. I was never shy to accept challenges in my life and with the same intent and thought process I accepted this as well and participated in the school debate competition. My aunt was one of the teacher’s in the school and she helped me in the preparation.

I was thoroughly prepared and continuously was revising by seeing in the mirror – imagining me to be the audience of my speech. Look in the mirror technique is what I had heard and had picked up – which I thought was the most promising technique considering I had never spoken in front of audience and this would be of considerable help to me, overcoming my stage fear. Yet this technique had to be put to practice.

And, finally the day had come when I had to present my speech in front of the entire school – students and faculties. The feeling is still fresh in my memory. I went up to the stage when my name was called and stood there right in front of everyone. I then started the introductory welcome message and introduced the topic. I said the first sentence of the long speech I had been practising and then paused. I tried to recollect the rest of the speech but could not as if the words flew from my memory. I again tried but paused after the first sentence. I then realized that I cannot regain the momentum – neither could I recollect the words. Though the faculties were encouraging me to speak again, I was lost and rushed to the restroom and cried.

Defeat is only a stepping stone to success

My aunt came and consoled me but at that point the feeling was horrible and I felt defeated, the feeling which I do not like at all. I promised to myself that I will one day give fantastic speeches and will leave the audience spellbound. The time was again for a new start, a new competition and this time again I assembled all the energy and directed my focus to win. And eventually I performed a lot better and won the competition. It was a great motivation and from then onward I had been participating and winning. I also won the All India Best Presenter Award and the State Level Best Presenter award.

Top rules for overcoming failure and delivering presentations

  1. Never let failure worry you – it is just a phase and will pass like every other phase.
  2. Assimilate your energy and focus at the task at hand.
  3. Prepare well and do your research on the topic – both vertical and lateral research so that you are confident.
  4. Make one liner or bookmarked notes and practice without the narrative.
  5. Be confident of yourself and keep saying it to yourself repeatedly that ‘you are the best’.
  6. Don’t be afraid of what people might think about you – you are there to deliver your best.
  7. Be mindful of your rate of speech, loudness, pitch, tone and gestures.
  8. At last, always imagine that you will succeed.

Debt Settlement Debt Negotiation – Insider Tips

The warning signs of impending legal complications are clear. Collectors call more often and the tone of conversations become increasingly aggressive. The escalation in aggressiveness is intentional. Professional collectors develop a keen sense for the level of stress in each account holder’s voice. By pushing stress buttons repeatedly, collectors know that an aggressive approach forces debtors to react.

Account holders are not required to accept collector calls. Original obligations arise from dealing directly with creditors, and each account holder may contact a creditor using the same aggressive approaches used by collectors. At first blush, this tactic may seem appealing and perhaps deserved. The results, however, are not productive.

Negotiating a profitable debt settlement requires a high level of professionalism. Avoid using the childish tactics preferred by collectors. Instead, take the lead when dealing with creditors by proposing negotiation of future payments based on reason. Expect creditors to require documentation before accepting settlement.

A professional negotiation of a debt settlement begins by focusing on the cause of past due late payments. Each person’s current repayment ability is a primary focus. The most common situations that cause late payments include illness, job loss and divorce. In addition, unexpected salary reductions, home repairs and vehicle repairs frequently prevent making payments on unsecured accounts. Documentation of these causes is highly influential when negotiating debt settlement agreements.

The best negotiators do not impose personal bias in conversations. Allow documentation to carry the load and speak for itself. A wise creditor evaluates documentation carefully to determine the maximum recovery available. To produce settlements for pennies on the dollar, provide overwhelming evidence that repayment is doubtful based on a realistic assessment of available income and the cost of basic living necessities.

Debt consolidation companies negotiate with national lenders on a daily basis. Over time, professional negotiators develop working relations with all major credit card companies, banks, and providers of retail credit. These companies represent individual account holders during all phases of the negotiation process. Daily practice produces the best results obtainable. Professional negotiators know, with a high degree of probability, the largest negotiated payment reduction possible before contacting a creditor. Once the ultimate prize is apparent, deciding when to push forward or settle is easy.

The cost of hiring a professional negotiator is surprisingly affordable. Fees are paid by including a negotiated one-month grace period before payments resume. The amount of the new monthly payment represents a typical fee to obtain a 40% to 60% payment reduction over three or four years.

Canned Sales Presentations Just Don’t Work Today

Flip charts and slides shows (“canned presentations”) make the best sales product or service promotions because, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” right? Well it depends!

Stanford University’s Research Institute’s VALS study (values, altitudes and life styles) lists five distinct psychographic categories (personalities) or buying decision-making modes. What the Stanford research means to you as a sales manager is that a given picture may not appeal to one or more of the buying mind-sets (Belongers, Achiever, Emulator, etc.) outlined in the study. Using a flip chart or slides as your primary presentation tool can cost you sales, especially if you just walk through each page or play each slide as an outline of your products or service’s features and benefits.

Flip charts and slide presentations must be generic by nature and rarely focus on a decision-maker’s specific needs except for a few slides or pages. From the Stanford research, using this selling approach means that you have one chance in five of appealing to your decision-maker’s primary buying mode depending on the layout and copy theme of the slides or chart.

Slide shows or flip chart presentations are valuable tools if used to highlight specific selling points–points based in the information that your staff members uncover from their in-depth probing (using a consultative selling system) of a prospective customer or client’s needs. The myth of using a “canned sales pitch” and the field-tested and proven selling methods to replace defective techniques are outlined in the “best selling” 101 Sales Myths manual published by The $elling Edge┬«, Inc. (http://TheSellingEdge.com/myths3.htm) The techniques listed are are based in a proven consultative selling process that eliminates most of the fear and pressure associated with traditional presentation approaches.